Chandigarh MC will call on a private actor to treat biomedical waste

Biomedical waste, such as sanitary napkins and diapers, which pose a serious danger to the environment and human health, was largely dumped untreated in the city.

From now on, the municipal corporation (MC) will attach a private actor to treat all the biomedical waste generated in the homes.

MC Commissioner Anindita Mitra said, “We have obtained a certificate from the Pollution Control Committee of Chandigarh (CPCC) for the company solely responsible for handling all biomedical waste in the city. Biomedical waste generated in households will also be treated by this company, Alliance Envirocare.

According to estimates, Chandigarh generates around 750 kg of biomedical waste per day. Household biomedical waste will be incinerated at the company’s industrial zone facility.

Even though the MC lobbied for the collection of sorted waste almost four years ago, only four to five months ago it made provision for the collection of biomedical waste generated by households. Its more than 500 door-to-door household waste bins are now equipped with bins dedicated to the collection of biomedical waste.

Previously, the waste was collected with other solid waste and dumped at the Dadumajra dump site without any treatment required, thus causing environmental pollution.

“After MC started collecting biomedical waste separately from other solid waste, we also started treating it using incinerators. But these are much smaller than needed and sufficient to handle the full treatment,” Mitra said.

The MC will submit the agenda on the same before the MC General House meeting on July 29. The treatment will cost around MC 96 lakh per year.

There are four types of solid waste including dry, wet, hazardous and sanitary waste. In accordance with the 2016 solid waste management rules, all households must separate their waste. (Photo HT)

Households are responsible for separating

The MC had started door-to-door rubbish collection from its own vehicles, numbering around 540, last year in January. The vehicles have four bins to collect different types of waste.

There are four types of solid waste including dry, wet, hazardous and sanitary waste. In accordance with the 2016 solid waste management rules, all households must separate their waste.

Source separation is the responsibility of household and door-to-door waste collectors. People must separate waste before giving it to waste collectors, and they in turn must deposit it in separated form.

“We recently organized a training session for sanitation workers, which particularly focused on the collection of sorted waste,” Mitra said.

The MC will also soon intensify its awareness campaign aimed at households to promote the sorting of waste at source. Leaflets will be distributed to each household on this subject. Previously, the MC had enlisted the residents’ welfare associations and the market welfare association to encourage people to separate.

Along with the awareness campaign, the MC will also aggressively pursue the penalization of households, which do not segregate waste at source. “After analyzing the waste collection scheme, we focused on individual households, which do not give separate waste. The success of the waste management process is highly dependent on the people sorting the waste at source,” Mitra said.

The fine for non-segregation of waste at source ranges from 232 to 11576 by default depending on the category of the unit.


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