Industrial arts – Maximum Douglas http://maximumdouglas.com/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 12:24:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://maximumdouglas.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Industrial arts – Maximum Douglas http://maximumdouglas.com/ 32 32 Industrial Arts Brewing Company – Market Manager – NYC – BevNET.com Beverage Industry Job Listing https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-arts-brewing-company-market-manager-nyc-bevnet-com-beverage-industry-job-listing/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 12:10:31 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-arts-brewing-company-market-manager-nyc-bevnet-com-beverage-industry-job-listing/ MARKET DIRECTOR – NYC New York, Bronx, Kings, Queens, Richmond, Suffolk and Nassau counties Represent and develop IABC in onsite and offsite commerce in assigned territory LOCATION: Each market manager has a defined territory and is “on the road” the majority of their work week with occasional in-person check-ins at the brewery in Beacon, NY. […]]]>

MARKET DIRECTOR – NYC

New York, Bronx, Kings, Queens, Richmond, Suffolk and Nassau counties

Represent and develop IABC in onsite and offsite commerce in assigned territory

LOCATION:
Each market manager has a defined territory and is “on the road” the majority of their work week with occasional in-person check-ins at the brewery in Beacon, NY.

REPORTS TO:
Managing Partner – Jeff O’Neil

About Industrial Arts Brewing Company:

IABC opened in 2016 at our historic Garnerville NY location. We modernized a pre-Civil War complex to include a 25 HL brewhouse, 30,000 square feet of cellar and warehouse space, and a sunny dining room open to the public. To keep pace with our rapid growth, we secured a second location in Beacon, NY in late 2018. Beacon is home to our second valve room and a state-of-the-art, purpose-built 70,000 square foot facility with a 100 HL a bespoke brewery and a modern, flexible and efficient packaging line.

Working at Industrial Arts Brewing Company:

We have a responsibility to help build and sustain the communities in which we live and work, and we honor that by showing respect and appreciation for everyone we rely on to deliver our liquid message, including our employees. Our goal is to create and foster a workplace of professionals by providing good compensation for hard work, providing benefits that support individuals and families, minimizing overtime for a better work-life balance and providing the training and feedback needed to feel truly successful in your job. and career.

COMPENSATION STRUCTURE:

? Salary (exempt) + Quarterly Commission

? Annual incentive bonus

? Medical, dental and vision – IABC covers 60% for all policies, including family policies

? 12 weeks paid family leave

? 401k with business match after eligibility

? Mobile phone monthly reimbursement

? Annual allowance for personal protective equipment (workbooks, etc.)

? 11 Paid Company Leave

? 15 days of paid vacation

SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Represent IABC with extreme professionalism in the market at all times. Adopt and represent the values ​​of the brewery and the identity of the brand at all times
  • Work closely with business partners to promote and grow our brand in designated territory
  • Visit and meet with onsite and offsite accounts on a weekly basis
  • Achieve/exceed sales targets set for assigned territory
  • Create an account base and open new business
  • Regular communication with distributor and retail partners to ensure quality standards and proper storage of products are met
  • Develop, maintain and document strategic partnerships with new and existing accounts onsite and offsite
  • Schedule and execute regular sales representative visits with distributor personnel
  • Conduct distributor-level and account-level trainings to educate stakeholders on IABC
  • Work with the supervisor to identify short, medium and long term opportunities in your unique territory
  • Analyze sales data to generate leads and capitalize on trends
  • Send weekly summaries to distributor management and representative staff
  • Use KARMA daily to log account visits and account information.
  • Ensure accurate quarterly forecasts and consistent inventory at the distributor level.
  • Ensure good on-site and off-site merchandising
  • Attend and contribute significantly to regular one-on-one meetings with supervisor, sales team meetings, and other team meetings as needed
  • Work with the supervisor to manage the sales budget for your unique territory
  • Create, plan and execute samplings at festivals, promotional events, etc.
  • Additional responsibilities as needed

PROFESSIONAL SKILLS REQUIRED:

  • Previous experience selling beer/drinks
  • Intimate knowledge of the brand
  • Skills in building and maintaining relationships
  • Ability to self-manage travel and weekly schedules
  • Ease with all software platforms needed to generate the data needed to support decision making by IABC (Encompass, iDIG, VIP, KARMA)
  • Thorough understanding of the three-tier system, distribution points, rate of sale, and overall volume planning and execution
  • General interest/enthusiasm for the craft beer industry
  • Computer proficiency in basic business software

OTHER REQUIRED CHARACTERISTICS:

  • Strong written and oral communication skills
  • Responsibility, team spirit, positive attitude and motivated autonomy
  • Up-to-date Covid-19 vaccination
  • 21 years or older
  • Valid driver’s license, clean driving record

SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS:
College degree preferred

SCHEDULE:

Approximately 40 hours per week with the ability to work nights/weekends and travel regularly


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Industrial Arts Brewing Company – Market Manager – NYC – Brewbound.com Craft Beer Job Listing https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-arts-brewing-company-market-manager-nyc-brewbound-com-craft-beer-job-listing/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 11:57:48 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-arts-brewing-company-market-manager-nyc-brewbound-com-craft-beer-job-listing/ MARKET DIRECTOR – NYC New York, Bronx, Kings, Queens, Richmond, Suffolk and Nassau counties Represent and develop IABC in onsite and offsite commerce in assigned territory LOCATION: Each market manager has a defined territory and is “on the road” the majority of their work week with occasional in-person check-ins at the brewery in Beacon, NY. […]]]>

MARKET DIRECTOR – NYC

New York, Bronx, Kings, Queens, Richmond, Suffolk and Nassau counties

Represent and develop IABC in onsite and offsite commerce in assigned territory

LOCATION:
Each market manager has a defined territory and is “on the road” the majority of their work week with occasional in-person check-ins at the brewery in Beacon, NY.

REPORTS TO:
Managing Partner – Jeff O’Neil

About Industrial Arts Brewing Company:

IABC opened in 2016 at our historic Garnerville NY location. We modernized a pre-Civil War complex to include a 25 HL brewhouse, 30,000 square feet of cellar and warehouse space, and a sunny dining room open to the public. To keep pace with our rapid growth, we secured a second location in Beacon, NY in late 2018. Beacon is home to our second valve room and a state-of-the-art, purpose-built 70,000 square foot facility with a 100 HL a bespoke brewery and a modern, flexible and efficient packaging line.

Working at Industrial Arts Brewing Company:

We have a responsibility to help build and sustain the communities in which we live and work, and we honor that by showing respect and appreciation for everyone we rely on to carry our liquid message, including our employees. Our goal is to create and foster a workplace of professionals by providing good compensation for hard work, providing benefits that support individuals and families, minimizing overtime for a better work-life balance and giving the training and feedback needed to feel truly successful in your job. and career.

COMPENSATION STRUCTURE:

? Salary (exempt) + Quarterly Commission

? Annual incentive bonus

? Medical, dental and vision – IABC covers 60% for all policies, including family policies

? 12 weeks paid family leave

? 401k with business match after eligibility

? Mobile phone monthly reimbursement

? Annual allowance for personal protective equipment (workbooks, etc.)

? 11 Paid Company Leave

? 15 days of paid vacation

SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Represent IABC with extreme professionalism in the market at all times. Adopt and represent the values ​​of the brewery and the identity of the brand at all times
  • Work closely with business partners to promote and grow our brand in designated territory
  • Visit and meet with onsite and offsite accounts on a weekly basis
  • Achieve/exceed sales targets set for assigned territory
  • Create an account base and open new business
  • Regular communication with distributor and retail partners to ensure quality standards and proper product storage are met
  • Develop, maintain and document strategic partnerships with new and existing accounts onsite and offsite
  • Schedule and execute regular sales representative visits with distributor personnel
  • Conduct distributor-level and account-level trainings to educate stakeholders on IABC
  • Work with the supervisor to identify short, medium and long term opportunities in your unique territory
  • Analyze sales data to generate leads and capitalize on trends
  • Send weekly summaries to distributor management and representative staff
  • Use KARMA daily to log account visits and account information.
  • Ensure accurate quarterly forecasts and consistent inventory at the distributor level.
  • Ensure good on-site and off-site merchandising
  • Attend and contribute significantly to regular one-on-one meetings with supervisor, sales team meetings, and other team meetings as needed
  • Work with the supervisor to manage the sales budget for your unique territory
  • Create, plan and execute samplings at festivals, promotional events, etc.
  • Additional responsibilities as needed

PROFESSIONAL SKILLS REQUIRED:

  • Previous experience selling beer/drinks
  • Intimate knowledge of the brand
  • Skills in building and maintaining relationships
  • Ability to self-manage travel and weekly schedules
  • Ease with all software platforms needed to generate the data needed to support decision making by IABC (Encompass, iDIG, VIP, KARMA)
  • Thorough understanding of the three-tier system, distribution points, rate of sale, and overall volume planning and execution
  • General interest/enthusiasm for the craft beer industry
  • Computer proficiency in basic business software

OTHER REQUIRED CHARACTERISTICS:

  • Strong written and oral communication skills
  • Responsibility, team spirit, positive attitude and motivated autonomy
  • Up-to-date Covid-19 vaccination
  • 21 years or older
  • Valid driver’s license, clean driving record

SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS:
College degree preferred

SCHEDULE:

Approximately 40 hours per week with the ability to work nights/weekends and travel regularly


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Industrial arts teacher ready to build a new life in retirement https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-arts-teacher-ready-to-build-a-new-life-in-retirement/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 21:00:34 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-arts-teacher-ready-to-build-a-new-life-in-retirement/ During this time Menz learned to weld and then in 1973 left the farm for Saskatoon where he worked in construction and carpentry. He earned a journeyman ticket in carpentry in 1982. “The economy was very uncertain and there wasn’t much to do, so I was able, with the support of my father’s estate, to […]]]>

During this time Menz learned to weld and then in 1973 left the farm for Saskatoon where he worked in construction and carpentry. He earned a journeyman ticket in carpentry in 1982.

“The economy was very uncertain and there wasn’t much to do, so I was able, with the support of my father’s estate, to go back to college and get an education,” Menz said. , noting that he earned a bachelor’s degree in education. in 1987. “I thought it was a good choice and I wanted to help and work with people. The fact that I could combine my carpentry and welding skills to help people, education seemed like a good fit.

His first teaching job was at Saskatoon Community Regional College (Saskatchewan Polytechnic) and he remained there until he accepted a job at Northlands College in Pinehouse Lake in 1991. In 1993 he moved to La Ronge for a job at Senator Myles Venne School and in 1999 he accepted his current position at Churchill.

“The beauty of being an industrial arts teacher is that you can work with your hands and do things that you really love,” Menz said. “I’m teaching something enjoyable and I think it’s also very valuable. There are a number of kids who have gone into the trades. Just giving them the exposure to another job choice, I think, is one of the rewarding parts of that.

Over the years, Menz has focused primarily on carpentry and welding. When the students come to her class in grade 7, they build a toolbox and a simple bookshelf. In grade 8, students create a treasure chest and in the next grade they make a folding table. Once in high school, Menz teaches students how to make garden cabinets and sheds.

When Churchill underwent a major refurbishment in the 2010s, Menz was involved in the design and fitting out.

“The old workshop was adequate, but we had no welding space,” he said. “This one has 22 stations, so there’s quite a bit of room for students.”

Menz explained that the school division has already chosen a teacher to replace him, adding that this individual could also start teaching mechanics in the next school year.

In the coming months, Menz plans to leave La Ronge. He wants to retire with his wife, Joni, to land near Macdowall. He would like to spend more time with his son, daughter and two grandchildren.

“We are going to move and it will happen this summer,” he said. “We are selling our place and we have an area near Macdowall. We have about 18 acres there. We will also build a house there. Right now we already have a mobile home there.

derek.cornet@pattisonmedia.com

Twitter: @saskjourno



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NC students do well in industrial arts competition | Education https://maximumdouglas.com/nc-students-do-well-in-industrial-arts-competition-education/ Mon, 16 May 2022 18:15:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/nc-students-do-well-in-industrial-arts-competition-education/ North County High School Industrial Arts students who participated in the Missouri Association of Technology Educators Workshop Competition from April 21-22 at Three Rivers College achieved great results with 217 projects in various mediums. Students had 16/16 for No. 1 grades. The 73rd Annual TEAM Industrial Technology Show was held at the Bess Activity Center […]]]>

North County High School Industrial Arts students who participated in the Missouri Association of Technology Educators Workshop Competition from April 21-22 at Three Rivers College achieved great results with 217 projects in various mediums. Students had 16/16 for No. 1 grades.

The 73rd Annual TEAM Industrial Technology Show was held at the Bess Activity Center at Three Rivers College. Three Rivers College has hosted the fair for over 20 years.

Savannah Hasemeier of North County, who built a “gentleman’s table” for her project, won a $2,400 scholarship. North County’s Kyle Carver won Best in Class for “End Table.”






North County’s Kyle Carver wins Best in Class for his ‘End Table’.


Three Rivers


The North County students, their grades and categories were:

  • Lane Brown, exemplary rating (1), welding
  • Tara Walters-Lynnette, Exemplary Rating (1), State Qualification, Welding
  • Kyle Carver, Exemplary Rating (1), District Division Champion for Welding, State Qualifier, Welding
  • Nevin Rodenberg, exemplary note (1), blacksmith
  • Brian Vollertsen, Exemplary Rating (1), State Qualifier, Welding
  • Tye Polston, Exemplary Rating (1), Woodworking
  • Savannah Hasemeier, Exemplary Rating (1), 2022 MoTEAM District Excellence Scholarship Winner ($500/yr), Woodworking
  • Lexi Minchew, Exemplary Rating (1), State Qualification, Woodworking
  • Abbi Skaggs, copy (1) Note, woodworking
  • Autumn Karsch, Exemplary (1) Appraisal, woodworking
  • Jake Flowers, Exemplary Rating (1), Sheet Metal Fabrication
  • Dalton Martin, exemplary dimension (1), welding
  • Cole Barnes, Exemplary Rating (1), Welding
  • Abigail Terry, Exemplary Rating (1), State Qualification, Carpentry
  • Issac Gaugel, Exemplary Ranking (1), State Qualifier, Blacksmith
  • Jacob Murphy, Exemplary Rating (1), State Qualification, Woodworking

People also read…

“The Industrial Technology Fair provides an invaluable experience for students to attend and compete,” said Heather Carlton, information systems technology instructor at Three Rivers and one of the event coordinators. “It inspires them to go all out in their work and allows them to see what other students like them are creating. The end result tends to be amazing, professional quality projects.

TEAM (Technology Education Association of Missouri) is a teacher organization affiliated with ITEEA (International Technology and Engineering Educators Association), ACTE (Association for Career and Technical Education), National TSA (Technology Student Association), and Missouri TSA. The organization focuses on supporting industrial technology educators by offering conferences, educational workshops and newsletters, curriculum, and competitive programs for students.


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Launch New Careers at Onaway Institute of Industrial Arts https://maximumdouglas.com/launch-new-careers-at-onaway-institute-of-industrial-arts/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/launch-new-careers-at-onaway-institute-of-industrial-arts/ “Welding can kind of take you anywhere you want to go. Sky is the limit.” the Institute of Industrial Arts at Onaway is a unique trade school specializing in welding. “Our philosophy here is noble workmanship. We prepare them for what to expect and what employers want when they come into the industry,” says Tammi […]]]>

“Welding can kind of take you anywhere you want to go. Sky is the limit.”

the Institute of Industrial Arts at Onaway is a unique trade school specializing in welding.

“Our philosophy here is noble workmanship. We prepare them for what to expect and what employers want when they come into the industry,” says Tammi Ward.

Tammi Ward is the Executive Director of Institute of Industrial Arts and has been part of the team since 2014.
And she strives to make the program really feel like work.

Tammi says, “It’s a 19-week program and we treat it like a job. This is called an employer model. They clock in at 7:45 a.m., ready to go to work at 8 a.m., they have some lecture time where they focus on learning how to weld, then we head straight to the lab and it’s hands-on welding fabrication for the rest of the day.

“They try to prepare us as much as possible for the job, which I appreciate. I’ve only ever had one job,” explains Albert Mosely, a student.

Their students are currently between 17 and over 50 years old.
And as students like Albert Mosley have learned, experience isn’t necessary…

He shares: “When I started, I didn’t know what I wanted to do. I didn’t even know welding was a real thing until I came here.

I haveQuickly discover a new career path….

“I knew I didn’t want to go to college. I knew I wanted to do something practical.

And that’s exactly what IAI provides–
Individual and practical experience.

Ward tells us, “Our instructors are not teachers. They are industry experts learning to teach. And they bring that body of knowledge about what it’s really like to work.

IAI ensures students are in safe hands–
With welding instructors who are professionals in the trade.

“I became a Certified Welding Inspector 7 years ago,” says Welding Instructor Jeff Brown. Welding

Like Jeff Brown, whose journey includes nearly 30 years of making.

He says, “It’s exciting, especially for those who have never welded before. And you see some of them now sticking out, and I think that’s really rewarding.

But welding and fabrication aren’t the only things IAI offers its students on the road to success…

Albert says: “They help us develop our skills to get into places, interviews. They help us with interviews so that we don’t look so nervous, so that we know how to hold ourselves properly when talking to someone, how to express our voice is a little… It’s really worth it.


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This high-tech tool “hooks” high school students to industrial arts and opens the door to careers in aerospace https://maximumdouglas.com/this-high-tech-tool-hooks-high-school-students-to-industrial-arts-and-opens-the-door-to-careers-in-aerospace/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 23:56:42 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/this-high-tech-tool-hooks-high-school-students-to-industrial-arts-and-opens-the-door-to-careers-in-aerospace/ A salmon made from steel rolled on Sitka High School’s new plasma cutter, and finished by artist Charlie Skultka, Jr. (KCAW/Woolsey) A grant-funded program at Sitka High School is active again, after a two-year setback during the pandemic. Students in vocational and technical training courses gain hands-on experience working with equipment that could take their […]]]>
A salmon made from steel rolled on Sitka High School’s new plasma cutter, and finished by artist Charlie Skultka, Jr. (KCAW/Woolsey)

A grant-funded program at Sitka High School is active again, after a two-year setback during the pandemic. Students in vocational and technical training courses gain hands-on experience working with equipment that could take their skills to the next level – literally – and propel them into jobs in the aerospace industry.

The high school shopping lesson conjures up all sorts of images – I’m sure many see it as “The Breakfast Club” for kids who don’t quite fit in elsewhere, a mix of motorheads and carpenters tearing up cars rusted and nailing backyard storage sheds.

CNC (Computerized Numerical Control) machines aren’t new to Sitka High; students have been using smaller CNC equipment for several years to make vinyl decals and engraved wood projects. But this plasma cutter is bigger and more versatile than anything else the Sitka students have seen. “It’s just limited to your imagination,” says CTE instructor Mike Vieira. (KCAW/Woolsey)

But it is high time to abandon this stereotype. Mike Vieira, a teacher at Sitka High Career and Technical Education (CTE), uses a $30,000 plasma cutter, a tool that takes a pattern or design — it could be anything you can create on a computer screen. computer – and cuts it with precision in rolled steel or other metal.

Vieira says CTE is not your grandfather’s workshop class.

“Our goal is to produce students who are ready for high-demand, high-skilled, high-paying jobs,” Vieira said. “And the way the world turns – there will definitely be large-scale manufacturing – it comes down to small stores that are going to be able to produce single-use items. So unique pieces of this and unique pieces of that, and to do that you need to be able to come in with CAD (computer aided design) you need to be able to take your CAD file and output it to a device and tell it how to run its toolpath. And from there, and then it’s just limited to your imagination.

Sitka’s CTE program won a $10,000 grant from BP in 2018 to support the purchase of this cutter, which moves an 85-amp plasma torch – which looks like an arc welder – across a wide table at waist height. There’s now a piece of steel on the table with a dozen die-cut shapes, a collection of die-cut salmon, sports logos and house numbers – all designed by students.

“It’s a lot of fun,” said Nik Calhoun, a senior at Sitka High. “You learn to program on the computer and through CAD, it’s really cool, actually.”

SHS student Nik Calhoun used the plasma cutter to make this bear head, which will be part of a new sign for Sitka Elementary School. The traditional formline piece was designed by artist Charlie Skultka, Jr. (KCAW/Woolsey)

Calhoun shows me a bear’s head rendered in the traditional Northwest Coast form-line design, from a pattern drawn by Sitka artist Charlie Skultka, Jr. It’s about two feet wide, is painted beige and is mounted on a backing plate that will be part of a new sign outside Sitka Elementary School. This is only his third or fourth plasma cutter project, and it looks like it could have come from a professional store.

“This one here for Baranof (elementary school),” Calhoun said. “It took me about a class and a half. So it’s quite fast. »

The beauty of the plasma cutter is contained in this work: the school district would never order a custom sign like this – it’s just too expensive and time consuming to make by hand. The plasma cutter brings the efficiency of a manufacturing process to produce something very unique. And it’s an amazing way to approach new designs – just like high-end manufacturers like Boeing are doing now.

Seniors Tyler Barton (L), Nik Calhoun and Kori Williams with a bear head by artist Charlie Skultka, Jr. made on Sitka High’s plasma cutter. Williams recently moved to Sitka from Gustavus, and she found the CTE program to be a revelation. “When I first signed up for my classes here, I had a choice between doing creative writing or design fabrication,” Williams said, “and I was hesitant to choose design fabrication. , because it was my only opening for creative writing, which is something I love to do. Honestly, I decided to do it on a whim and I’m so glad I did. ( KCAW/Woolsey)

“We are fortunate to be one of 40 Boeing partner schools,” said Matt Johnson, a visiting CTE from Snohomish High School. “And we have a program called Core Plus Manufacturing, which is an aerospace and advanced manufacturing focused program that was developed in part by Boeing and some of their major suppliers who work with them. And students get an industry-recognized certificate at the end of my class. And if they have that certificate, Boeing said, “We guarantee you’ll get an interview.”

Johnson was the 2018 CTE Teacher of the Year in Washington State. Mike Vieira met Johnson via social media, applied for funding from New Visions, a program of the Alaska State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts, and offered him an invitation to Sitka for three days this spring to train Sitka’s CTE faculty. on the cutter, and to work with students, who now see the workshop class through different eyes.

“So in my school, this plasma cutter is the workhorse,” Johnson said. “It’s almost an instant gratification machine where kids can take an idea, put it on a computer screen, and a few minutes later have something they can then grind, work on, and apply color, and having something tangible. So that’s a great way to get into a low-risk way of doing really precise things. And then we can build from there, because I teach aerospace skills and and where do we go from there. So for my school, this plasma cutter is where we can hook the kids into these projects.”

“I was working on an inlay, yeah a wood inlay project on the CNC router,” student Tyler Barton said, reflecting on what he was doing before the cutter came along. “And now I’m going to move on to this plasma cutter. I have already cut two product projects on this.

Matt Johnson, guest teacher at Snohomish High School CTE, works with a student who completes a part of the plasma cutter. There’s a practical aspect to using the plasma cutter that’s comparable to the workshop courses of decades past, and even the CAD programming aspect can feel a bit old-fashioned at times. “I think a lot of the technology that students are working with now is built into apps on their smartphones,” Johnson says, “so I think even if there’s a kind of adaptability to people of this generation , there’s still a lot of learning about the steps and the nuances of it. I don’t think kids sit in front of a desktop as much as they did 10 years ago. (KCAW/Woolsey)

Tyler Barton is also a senior. He went from wood to metal when the cutter arrived. But he does not plan to use his skills professionally. He heads to college and the cutter helps him see what’s possible

“I took this course because I want to be an engineer,” he said. “And I thought it would be an interesting class, seeing a lot of computer stuff. I could definitely do that as a hobby. I would love to do that as a hobby.

And my editorial observation of that remark is this: Wilbur and Orville Wright were bicycle mechanics, whose hobby was airplanes.

Before leaving the CTE building, instructor Mike Vieira tells me that working with Matt Johnson was one of his best teaching days – a chance for his students to see that the learning never stops.

“I kind of gave him my classes,” Vieira said, “and I’m just a student alongside my students, which I think is fun for me and fun for my students to see me in. this role.”


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Region’s Professional and Industrial Arts Programs Gain Provincial Support – PembinaValleyOnline.com https://maximumdouglas.com/regions-professional-and-industrial-arts-programs-gain-provincial-support-pembinavalleyonline-com-2/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/regions-professional-and-industrial-arts-programs-gain-provincial-support-pembinavalleyonline-com-2/ State-of-the-art equipment upgrades are underway for technical, vocational and industrial arts programs at five area schools. The Manitoba government announced Friday that it will provide more than $1.4 million for technology upgrades through the Skills Strategy Equipment Improvement Fund (SSEEF). “We want all children and young people to have access to a range of opportunities, […]]]>

State-of-the-art equipment upgrades are underway for technical, vocational and industrial arts programs at five area schools.

The Manitoba government announced Friday that it will provide more than $1.4 million for technology upgrades through the Skills Strategy Equipment Improvement Fund (SSEEF).

“We want all children and young people to have access to a range of opportunities, so that every learner succeeds through a high-quality education that prepares them for lifelong learning,” said the Minister of Early Childhood Learning and Education, Wayne Ewasko. “Providing financial support to school divisions for the purchase of state-of-the-art technical, vocational and industrial arts education equipment provides Manitoba students with the opportunity to gain valuable real-world experience.

Technology education programs require schools to have facilities and equipment that resemble real work environments that meet occupational safety and health and industry standards. The province says SSEEF grants will help school divisions purchase equipment for technical, vocational and industrial education facilities in schools to ensure alignment with learning and education standards. industry.

Approved local projects include:
Roseau Valley School Automotive Technology, Border Land School Division – $42,351.71
Garden Valley Collegiate Heavy Duty Equipment Technology, Garden Valley School Division – $33,724.64
Pilot Mound Collegiate Institute Woodwork Technology, Prairie Spirit School Division – $90,317.02
Morris School Collision Repair and Refinish Technology, Red River Valley School Division – $12,193.69
Morden Collegiate Institute Welding Technology, Western School Division – $33,261.73

This year, more than $1.4 million in SSEEF grants are being disbursed to 35 schools in Manitoba.

“These grants provide young Manitobans with the skills, talent and knowledge needed to live, learn and work in a competitive global economy,” said Ewasko. “I would like to thank our school divisions for their continued cooperation and collaboration as we work together to improve technical, vocational and industrial arts education in Manitoba.

Details on applications for the 2022-2023 grant program will be posted this spring. Click here for more information.


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Area Professional and Industrial Arts Programs Receive Provincial Support – PembinaValleyOnline.com https://maximumdouglas.com/area-professional-and-industrial-arts-programs-receive-provincial-support-pembinavalleyonline-com/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/area-professional-and-industrial-arts-programs-receive-provincial-support-pembinavalleyonline-com/ State-of-the-art equipment upgrades are underway for technical, vocational and industrial arts programs at five area schools. The Manitoba government announced Friday that it will provide more than $1.4 million for technology upgrades through the Skills Strategy Equipment Improvement Fund (SSEEF). “We want all children and young people to have access to a range of opportunities, […]]]>

State-of-the-art equipment upgrades are underway for technical, vocational and industrial arts programs at five area schools.

The Manitoba government announced Friday that it will provide more than $1.4 million for technology upgrades through the Skills Strategy Equipment Improvement Fund (SSEEF).

“We want all children and young people to have access to a range of opportunities, so that every learner succeeds through a high-quality education that prepares them for lifelong learning,” said the Minister of Early Childhood Learning and Education, Wayne Ewasko. “Providing financial support to school divisions for the purchase of state-of-the-art technical, vocational and industrial arts education equipment provides Manitoba students with the opportunity to gain valuable real-world experience.

Technology education programs require schools to have facilities and equipment that resemble real work environments that meet occupational safety and health and industry standards. The province says SSEEF grants will help school divisions purchase equipment for technical, vocational and industrial education facilities in schools to ensure alignment with learning and education standards. industry.

Approved local projects include:
Roseau Valley School Automotive Technology, Border Land School Division – $42,351.71
Garden Valley Collegiate Heavy Duty Equipment Technology, Garden Valley School Division – $33,724.64
Pilot Mound Collegiate Institute Woodwork Technology, Prairie Spirit School Division – $90,317.02
Morris School Collision Repair and Refinish Technology, Red River Valley School Division – $12,193.69
Morden Collegiate Institute Welding Technology, Western School Division – $33,261.73

This year, more than $1.4 million in SSEEF grants are being disbursed to 35 schools in Manitoba.

“These grants provide young Manitobans with the skills, talent and knowledge needed to live, learn and work in a competitive global economy,” said Ewasko. “I would like to thank our school divisions for their continued cooperation and collaboration as we work together to improve technical, vocational and industrial arts education in Manitoba.

Details on applications for the 2022-2023 grant program will be posted this spring. Click here for more information.


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Region’s Professional and Industrial Arts Programs Gain Provincial Support – PembinaValleyOnline.com https://maximumdouglas.com/regions-professional-and-industrial-arts-programs-gain-provincial-support-pembinavalleyonline-com/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/regions-professional-and-industrial-arts-programs-gain-provincial-support-pembinavalleyonline-com/ State-of-the-art equipment upgrades are underway for technical, vocational and industrial arts programs at five area schools. The Manitoba government announced Friday that it will provide more than $1.4 million for technology upgrades through the Skills Strategy Equipment Improvement Fund (SSEEF). “We want all children and young people to have access to a range of opportunities, […]]]>

State-of-the-art equipment upgrades are underway for technical, vocational and industrial arts programs at five area schools.

The Manitoba government announced Friday that it will provide more than $1.4 million for technology upgrades through the Skills Strategy Equipment Improvement Fund (SSEEF).

“We want all children and young people to have access to a range of opportunities, so that every learner succeeds through a high-quality education that prepares them for lifelong learning,” said the Minister of Early Childhood Learning and Education, Wayne Ewasko. “Providing financial support to school divisions for the purchase of state-of-the-art technical, vocational and industrial arts education equipment provides Manitoba students with the opportunity to gain valuable real-world experience.

Technology education programs require schools to have facilities and equipment that resemble real work environments that meet occupational safety and health and industry standards. The province says SSEEF grants will help school divisions purchase equipment for technical, vocational and industrial education facilities in schools to ensure alignment with learning and education standards. industry.

Approved local projects include:
Roseau Valley School Automotive Technology, Border Land School Division – $42,351.71
Garden Valley Collegiate Heavy Duty Equipment Technology, Garden Valley School Division – $33,724.64
Pilot Mound Collegiate Institute Woodwork Technology, Prairie Spirit School Division – $90,317.02
Morris School Collision Repair and Refinish Technology, Red River Valley School Division – $12,193.69
Morden Collegiate Institute Welding Technology, Western School Division – $33,261.73

This year, more than $1.4 million in SSEEF grants are being disbursed to 35 schools in Manitoba.

“These grants provide young Manitobans with the skills, talent and knowledge needed to live, learn and work in a competitive global economy,” said Ewasko. “I would like to thank our school divisions for their continued cooperation and collaboration as we work together to improve technical, vocational and industrial arts education in Manitoba.

Details on applications for the 2022-2023 grant program will be posted this spring. Click here for more information.


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Herald Lusk | Industrial arts add technology to circuits https://maximumdouglas.com/herald-lusk-industrial-arts-add-technology-to-circuits/ Thu, 07 Apr 2022 16:51:59 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/herald-lusk-industrial-arts-add-technology-to-circuits/ LUSK – An atmosphere of concentration and expectation fills Mr. Martinez’s industrial arts room as middle schoolers settle in with laptops and small circuit boards called arduino boards. Arduino boards sense the environment by receiving inputs from many sensors and affect its surroundings by controlling lights, motors, and other actuators. They are plugged into laptops […]]]>

LUSK – An atmosphere of concentration and expectation fills Mr. Martinez’s industrial arts room as middle schoolers settle in with laptops and small circuit boards called arduino boards. Arduino boards sense the environment by receiving inputs from many sensors and affect its surroundings by controlling lights, motors, and other actuators. They are plugged into laptops where seventh and eighth graders use open source and free software to practice coding and circuitry.

Students first build the diagrams on the laptop. They use block coding for the program, but all of them also learned from scratch. They can convert the blocks to zero in order to see the configuration and the individual coding commands.

For this particular project, once they set up their circuit of lights, they tell the program to run the sequence. If it works, they can convert the schematic to an actual wiring diagram that students will learn to read. Students then connect the arduino board to the laptop via USB. This provides the programming and power link. The students then connect the wires, the highest and the ground according to the wiring diagram, connecting power and trying out their new skills.

If everything is set up correctly, the students will see their lights turn off successively. As each group achieves this, they high five each other and wave to Martinez to look at what they’ve created. When a board doesn’t work as expected, some ask Martinez for help, but the students rarely need it, often problem-solving alone or with a peer to find the solution. Once they have completed the first step, they are instructed to reduce the relay time until the lights run in a row and up and down without much time in between.

This time the students change the timing in the scratch instead of using the coding blocks themselves. As they determine the timing and order, the students laugh and smile. What these students are doing is not only fun, but has myriad applications. As Martinez points out, as students become more proficient, they will work on programming functional electrical circuits and systems in the classroom and with real-world applications.


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