Industrial arts – Maximum Douglas http://maximumdouglas.com/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 14:59:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://maximumdouglas.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Industrial arts – Maximum Douglas http://maximumdouglas.com/ 32 32 Industrial arts teacher prepares the next generation for the workforce https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-arts-teacher-prepares-the-next-generation-for-the-workforce/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 07:02:25 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-arts-teacher-prepares-the-next-generation-for-the-workforce/ The sound of hammers hitting nails, the heavy roar of saws chewing on wood, tape measures popping back into place and booted feet hitting the subfloor are probably white noise to Brock Anderson, who is in his 23rd year. industrial arts education. On January 4, Anderson was busy supervising a class of high school students […]]]>


The sound of hammers hitting nails, the heavy roar of saws chewing on wood, tape measures popping back into place and booted feet hitting the subfloor are probably white noise to Brock Anderson, who is in his 23rd year. industrial arts education.

On January 4, Anderson was busy supervising a class of high school students under construction to move forward with the construction of a new home at 180 Parkridge Drive in Kalispell.

“We have our open house on May 11,” Anderson said.

Construction students are part of the Kalispell Student Built Homes program, which Anderson helped establish at Flathead High School in 2015, with help from community partners and professionals in the construction industry. The program has since opened up to include interested students from Glacier High School and Linderman Education Center.

Anderson, who joined the Flathead staff in 2007, said his first teaching position was in a seventh and eighth grade woodworking workshop in Sidney, MT, but growing up he had no idea that would be his path to ultimate career.

“I had no idea what I wanted to do – maybe something with my hands. Growing up I was still building forts and building stuff and helping mum and dad and grandfathers and grandmothers. I’ve always liked to build, or build, or work on cars, ”he said.

He had some exposure to the teaching profession through his father, who taught English in grades seven and eight in Columbia Falls, the town where Anderson grew up, but he was still unsure whether it was for him until he enrolled in Western Montana College. , now known as the University of Montana Western, to participate in wrestling and football.

“Come and find out that this is a college of teachers,” Anderson said with a smile.

He started to rethink the subjects he loved in high school.

“So I’m like, well, my favorite class in high school was industrial arts – the carpentry shop, welding. I guess I’ll be a store teacher.

“It went well. I am very lucky to enjoy what I am doing, ”he said.

After a year in Sidney, he accepted a position at CM Russell High School in Great Falls where he had to go back to school to learn how to teach a computer networking course in addition to lumber and pre-construction.

“I did a little bit of everything,” Anderson said. “I learn new things every day.”

“You have to be prepared to learn because it covers a wide range of skilled trades,” he said of being a career and technical education teacher.

After getting married, having taught in other cities, he wanted to come back to the valley to be closer to his parents and help them in case of need.

He went on to teach computer aided design, automotive and pre-construction classes, and then woods 1-4 at Flathead. Finally, the time had come to launch the Student-Built House program. The need to replenish a skilled workforce in the valley was evident, as was the interest of professionals in the construction industry to help. The students were eager to register.

“I had a lot of students who took the forest program to go to college with their friends. It is not a good solution for them. They come back. They are asking for jobs. They are practical children and I really saw a need for this program to give these children more skills to enter the skilled workforce with tools in their toolbox per se, ”he said. he declares.

HAVE THE The ability to take a high school construction course versus on-the-job training allows students to learn, ask questions, make mistakes and correct them without fear of being made redundant. He said they also learn the ropes from professionals who partner with the program.

“We have students at different levels, you know, in their education, but basically we’re an applied science class here,” Anderson said. “We teach them math. We teach them the charging points. They are taught to calculate concrete volumes. We do the Pythagorean theorem every day, ”he said.

Students who complete the construction class receive 360 ​​learning hours registered with the Montana Department of Labor. Students also learn all areas of construction starting with finding property lines.

“Many children will find a job before they leave the program. The builders will come to visit us, ”he said.

It means a lot to Anderson when students get an apprenticeship or find they can comfortably make a living in the trades. Attending college shouldn’t be the only mark of a successful person, he added.

“I’m very frustrated with our company, and part of education, that they consider you to be successful as a student if you go to college. The professional fields, the apprenticeship program, in which these children are enrolled, are very important. Right now these kids – if they show up and have the right attitude and work ethic – they can move up the ranks pretty quickly. We have a lot of success with our students who come out of this program and go into the various skilled trades. Many of these children are practical learners.

“We are missing that niche with these students to give them the opportunity to use their hands,” he said.

OPERATION OF A a high school program like this doesn’t end when the “for sale” sign goes up.

Work continues to make sure everything is in place for the house built by next year’s students – permits, subcontractors, suppliers, schedules – mowing the lawn in the summer until buyers move in – And complete the work under warranty.

“You have to be goal-oriented rather than time-oriented,” he said.

The biggest challenge he has faced in managing the program so far is the closure of schools during the pandemic.

“The hardest part was when Covid hit and closed the school,” he said.

Anderson, volunteer instructor Tim McLean and his two daughters, both students at Flathead, had to complete the house that year, he said.

The million dollar question for Anderson is why does he continue to teach rather than go into the private sector?

“You know, if we don’t do this for the next generation, who will? I mean someone cared enough about me, ”he said, naming former carpentry and welding teachers at Columbia Falls. “You know, they did that and they could have gone into a business and managed on their own, but someone has to be there to teach these kids. “

“Sometimes you have to see the big picture,” he added. “Money is good, but what are we doing to help the community? What are we doing to help the next generation of students and the skilled workforce? “

TO TAKE CARE community is something Anderson hopes to pass on to students.

“These children meet a lot of people from the neighborhood. These children shoveled sidewalks for people. We help where we can – just trying to teach those kids to give back. Help where help is needed, ”Anderson said.

“I think it’s so important for these kids to grow up, to know what it’s like to help someone, especially with their skills,” he said.

Construction sites present many dangers. Ensuring each other’s safety is also an integral part of the construction job that it hopes will translate into everyday life.

If there is anything he hopes to instill as a teacher, he said it would be, “No matter what you start, finish it. Whether it’s college, apprenticeship, or military, you just need to complete it. If you want to invest in yourself, have the foresight to see it through, ”he said.

Journalist Hilary Matheson can be reached at 406-758-4431 or hmatheson@dailyinterlake.com.


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‘What It’s About’: Officials Unveil New Industrial Arts Center at CMS | New https://maximumdouglas.com/what-its-about-officials-unveil-new-industrial-arts-center-at-cms-new/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/what-its-about-officials-unveil-new-industrial-arts-center-at-cms-new/ CLAREMONT – School and city officials joined representatives from the Boston Bruins organization and Red River Technology at Claremont Middle School on Wednesday to celebrate the completion of a fully industrial arts center. renovated three-room center-funded science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) lab grant program created by Red River and the NHL team. The project, […]]]>

CLAREMONT – School and city officials joined representatives from the Boston Bruins organization and Red River Technology at Claremont Middle School on Wednesday to celebrate the completion of a fully industrial arts center. renovated three-room center-funded science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) lab grant program created by Red River and the NHL team.

The project, which construction took place over the summer, converted vacant spaces on the lower level of the school into three state-of-the-art classrooms for teaching technology, computer science and fine arts. arts. Classrooms have been recently repainted, repainted, furnished and fitted with a host of state-of-the-art tools including laser cutter, 3D printer, kiln and pottery wheels, radio and film equipment, smart board and computers.

“This is what children and teachers deserve,” said Superintendent Michael Tempesta. “What excites me the most is the creativity that happens there. This place is such a hotbed of creativity right now. . . and we just want it to continue.

Claremont Middle School is only the second recipient of the STEM Lab Challenge grant, which Red River and the Boston Bruins established in 2018 to help New England schools improve their learning opportunities using technology for learning. point. The partners awarded the first grant to Sparks Academy, a public college in Lawrence, Massachusetts.

Claremont Middle School received the grant in 2019, beating approximately 60 New England schools.

“We were so excited because our head office is here,” said Gina Burke of the Red River Charitable Foundation. “The Boston Bruins were all in favor of him going here. “

Dan McGee, General Manager of Red River, thanked Rob Lovett, Claremont resident and school board member, for helping Claremont win the grant.

Lovett, who also works in Red River, nominated Claremont Middle School and applied for the grant on behalf of the district.

“Rob is not only deeply connected with Claremont but with Red River so he sees how we work,” said McGee. “So he was able to put the right messages in this [application], which really resonated with the Bruins and the Red River.

This celebration undoubtedly concerned the fruits made accessible through partnership and collaboration as much as the center itself, according to the officials present.

The partnership between the entities, including the two organizations and the City of Claremont, has grown over many years, McGee said, noting that Red River moved to Claremont due to the relationship it established with city ​​officials such as Claremont Business and Planning Director Nancy Merril as well as the partnerships that led to the revitalization of the Mill District, now home to Red River, The Common Man and, at Spring, an apartment building owned by Chinburg with 87 apartments at market prices.

“Change is taking shape [in Claremont] is real, ”McGee said. “There is revitalization and economic growth and there is an improvement in education that is happening with all of these other good deals happening.”

McGee also praised Red River’s long-standing business and philanthropic partnership with the Boston Bruins, saying many of their charitable endeavors were only possible through collaboration.

“Partnerships are really what it’s all about,” McGee said. “I don’t think schools can do it themselves. Cities cannot do it themselves. Red River and the Boston Bruins organization certainly don’t, no.

Claremont Mayor Charlene Lovett said the partnership has brought the kind of technology Claremont schools have long sought but have struggled to acquire, “not for lack of desire, but for lack of funding.”

“We knew that having access to the right technology would shape students’ interests and abilities and prepare them for career fields, some of which don’t yet exist,” Lovett said. “Unfortunately, in a community with a limited tax base, cutting edge STEM and STEAM labs were not financially feasible.”

A tour of the classrooms, where the seventh graders worked diligently on a range of different projects, illustrated the diversity of learning opportunities available.

In the tech lab Jeremiah Van Alstyne, 12, the seventh grader made decorative pencil holders, each individually fashioned from tools including a lathe, scissors, sandpaper and a wood torch. for an aesthetic coating.

“This one’s for my brother, who looks like a parchment because he likes mythological stuff,” Alstyne said. “This [other] one is a baseball bat, which I made for myself.

In the computer lab, students worked independently on projects using iPads. Isaac Garrow, 13, used Garageband, a music studio app, to add a new layer of bass to his music composition.

In the art room, Brandon “Brendon” Garner, 13, and Matthew Howard, 12, had completed their contribution to a collaborative project based on the work of Jen Stark, a concept artist known for her daring integration of color. and psychedelic patterns to create or naturalistic effects.

Howard said he found digital art creation tools difficult to control, although the introduction of technology into the art room is great for finding and sharing ideas with each other.

Alex Hill, a computer science professor, said the center not only enables students to understand and assess more advanced tools, but it has also boosted the offerings of after-school programs such as the Art Club, which has gained popularity during the pandemic.

“Right now the kids are in desperate need of anything after school,” Hill said. “Because they haven’t been able to be here so much in the past two years, they’re dying for this connection. All our clubs have therefore been filled to capacity. “


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Vanier College Industrial Arts Laboratory Upgrade Project Almost Completed https://maximumdouglas.com/vanier-college-industrial-arts-laboratory-upgrade-project-almost-completed/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/vanier-college-industrial-arts-laboratory-upgrade-project-almost-completed/ Vanier College students who use the industrial arts (IA) sector will no longer have to worry about respiratory problems any longer as the school division is modernizing the sector’s dust collection system. Vanier College students who use the industrial arts (IA) sector will no longer have to worry about respiratory problems any longer as the […]]]>

Vanier College students who use the industrial arts (IA) sector will no longer have to worry about respiratory problems any longer as the school division is modernizing the sector’s dust collection system.

Vanier College students who use the industrial arts (IA) sector will no longer have to worry about respiratory problems any longer as the school division is modernizing the sector’s dust collection system.

Replacing the system has been on the radar at Holy Trinity Catholic School Division since 2016, when a review indicated it would cost $ 250,000 to $ 300,000 to upgrade the dust collection infrastructure. Another review in 2020 revealed an “immediate” need to renovate the school’s IA zone.

A qualified engineer performed a site survey and found several code violations with the dust collector that the school was not tracking, a council report said.

Some violations included the presence of combustible and flammable materials within 15 meters of the welding area; the dust collector did not have an explosion vent directed to the outside; no adequate register return air in zone IA; the collector fan group having no shutdown in the event of fire or explosion; lack of relief valves; and the unit not having a spark detection or extinguishing system.

The division’s buildings department was forced to upgrade several life safety, electrical and mechanical systems based on the engineer’s review, the report continued.

Some changes included adding additional fire sprinklers to the entire area; updating of fire alarms and directional signs; improve lighting, panels, circuit breakers and wiring; the installation of a 10 ton outdoor heating / cooling unit with new or relocated ducts; and remove and reassign the weld area.

The Buildings Department created a revised budget of $ 441,331 – the money came from Holy Trinity’s Preventive Maintenance and Renewal (PMR) account – based on the new code requirements and the ability to improve the learning environment and air quality for the AI ​​lab and adjacent art and music. areas. The updated budget also took into account 19 existing equipment and two new items.

Seven contractors submitted bids, with the highest bid being $ 530,000 and the lowest bid – which was accepted – at $ 437,000, according to the report. The division awarded the contract to Christie Mechanical on May 26, which began work on the project on June 30 and was scheduled to end on October 6.

“Unfortunately, supply chain issues – which every project and contract faces – plagued our project, delaying the two main elements of the project: the dust collector and the RTU (rooftop unit),” the report continues.

The building department expected the last electrical hookups and the concrete slab to be completed by the first week of November, with the RTU to be completed by November 5 and the dust collector by November 9. .

“We only anticipate minor deficiencies which should not disrupt lessons or cause delays,” the report said.

Matt Heisler, facilities manager at Holy Trinity, told the Express that the dust collection system is operational while some pipes still need to be connected. The division expects the project to be officially completed in early December.

“(We) obviously depend on supply chain issues at this point. But other than that, it was quite successful and (we are) very happy to have it, ”he added.

The council report added that the total cost of the project, including professional fees, is estimated at $ 522,121.

The next meeting of the Holy Trinity Education Council will be on Monday December 13th.


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“Beautiful Partnership” refers to the industrial arts courses that continue at Fairview High School https://maximumdouglas.com/beautiful-partnership-refers-to-the-industrial-arts-courses-that-continue-at-fairview-high-school/ https://maximumdouglas.com/beautiful-partnership-refers-to-the-industrial-arts-courses-that-continue-at-fairview-high-school/#respond Wed, 27 Oct 2021 12:22:30 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/beautiful-partnership-refers-to-the-industrial-arts-courses-that-continue-at-fairview-high-school/ “Not many people go back to teaching and if they first became a teacher and then entered the industry, they probably won’t go back to the classroom.” Fraser says all of this happened after a longtime industrial art teacher retired and a replacement plan failed at the last minute. She adds that students can use […]]]>

“Not many people go back to teaching and if they first became a teacher and then entered the industry, they probably won’t go back to the classroom.”

Fraser says all of this happened after a longtime industrial art teacher retired and a replacement plan failed at the last minute.

She adds that students can use the college’s facilities, which Fraser describes as “amazing.”

“Up to this point the kids are really, almost encouraged to get out of town and go to college somewhere else, but really, at the heart of it all, (I) want the kids to see (what) Fairview has. “she said.

“They don’t need to go anywhere. They can live at home; they can take college programs here. There is such an amazing opportunity in our backyard to go to the GPRC in Fairview. ”

Fraser says what is taught changes every month.

The school year began with carpentry. They are currently studying welding along with upcoming mechanics and plumbing. Each student in the school studies the industrial arts. The latest student tally is 268.

Students also have the option of earning what are known as double credits, where high school students earn credits that count toward their first year of learning a trade. It would also speed up the process of becoming a companion.

Fraser adds that she is also happy to see a mix of men and women as instructors.

“They see that the professions are not just a man’s world. There are women involved in the trades and there are many, many opportunities for women to get involved in multiple industries within the trades. So, it’s exciting too.

Fraser says this is not a temporary fix, but a fix that could last for several years.


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Wayne County Fair 2021: Industrial Arts Award Winners https://maximumdouglas.com/wayne-county-fair-2021-industrial-arts-award-winners/ https://maximumdouglas.com/wayne-county-fair-2021-industrial-arts-award-winners/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 19:38:11 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/wayne-county-fair-2021-industrial-arts-award-winners/ Best of Show Award 2021 Wayne County Fair High School Industrial Arts Exhibition: (Industrial Arts – Wood): Mike Dobec, Walnut Coffee Table, Grades 10 and 11 (Technology): Wayne County Schools Career Center – Bulldozer Capstone Project [Engineering Senior Class] Other industrial arts award winners 2021 Wayne County Fair Industrial Arts Winners Norwayne High School, John […]]]>
Best of Show Industrial Arts by Mike Dobec, Grade 12, Triway High School

Best of Show Award

2021 Wayne County Fair High School Industrial Arts Exhibition:

(Industrial Arts – Wood): Mike Dobec, Walnut Coffee Table, Grades 10 and 11

(Technology): Wayne County Schools Career Center – Bulldozer Capstone Project

[Engineering Senior Class]

Industrial Technology, Best of Show Award, Wayne County Schools Career Center
Industrial Technology, Best of Show Award, Wayne County Schools Career Center

Other industrial arts award winners

2021 Wayne County Fair Industrial Arts Winners

Norwayne High School, John Plybon, instructor

Student’s name Project Grade Place

Jacob Rupp 12 basketball sign 2

Annabel Stanley Bear 10 1

Birdhouse Gavin Maibach 9 2

Jordan Steiner Browns Picture 12 1

Annabel Stanley Clock 10 1

Cutting board Gavin Maibach 9 1

Cutting board Lane Duplaga 10 2

Ethan Graf cutting board with handle 11 1

Annabel Stanley Dial Clock 10 1

Jevan Riggenbach chest of drawers 12 1

Jacob Rupp grandmother CNC signs 12 1

Gavin Maibach Horseshoe Table 9 1

Annabel Stanley superimposed cross 10 1

Lane Duplaga 10 Living Cutting Board 1

Ethan Graf Live Edge 11 end table 1

Yikealo Maibach NHS pillars 9 1

Rustic Chest Ethan Graf 11 1

Ethan Graf serving tray 11 1

Jacob Rupp Steam Logo 12 1

Ethan Graf stepladder 11 2

Tagen Ingold Tree Shelf 11 2


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Industrial Arts Brewing Company – Warehouse Supervisor – Brewbound.com https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-arts-brewing-company-warehouse-supervisor-brewbound-com/ https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-arts-brewing-company-warehouse-supervisor-brewbound-com/#respond Mon, 06 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-arts-brewing-company-warehouse-supervisor-brewbound-com/ WAREHOUSE SUPERVISOR Salary / Exempt Site: Garnerville and Beacon breweries Reports to: Senior Supply Chain Manager About Industrial Arts Brewing Company: The IABC opened in 2016 at our historic Garnerville NY site. We upgraded a pre-Civil War complex to include a 25 HL brewhouse, 30,000 square feet of cellar and warehouse space, and a sun-filled […]]]>

WAREHOUSE SUPERVISOR

Salary / Exempt

Site:

Garnerville and Beacon breweries

Reports to:

Senior Supply Chain Manager

About Industrial Arts Brewing Company:

The IABC opened in 2016 at our historic Garnerville NY site. We upgraded a pre-Civil War complex to include a 25 HL brewhouse, 30,000 square feet of cellar and warehouse space, and a sun-filled distribution room open to the public. To keep pace with our rapid growth, we secured a second location in Beacon, NY at the end of 2018. Home to our second valve room for the past two years, we have just completed construction of a 70,000 square foot lot. 000 square feet specially built for this purpose. -the art center with a personalized 100 HL brewery and a modern, flexible and efficient packaging line.

Working at Industrial Arts Brewing Company:

We have a responsibility to help build and maintain the communities in which we live and work, and we honor this by showing respect and appreciation for all those we rely on to spread our liquid message, including our employees. Our goal is to create and nurture a professional workplace by providing good pay for hard work, providing benefits that support individuals and families, minimizing overtime for better work-life balance and giving the training and feedback you need to be truly successful at your job. and career.

Manages the warehouses at Garnerville and Beacon and supervises warehouse operators and fulfillment operators. Ensure proper storage of all materials and ensure a safe, professional and efficient workplace. Provides an example of professionalism, safety, efficiency and punctuality.

Specific responsibilities:

Physical requirements:

21 years or older

Valid NYS driver’s license, clean driving record

Able to twist, bend, kneel, work in a noisy and humid factory environment on every shift

Able to regularly lift / transport 44 pound boxes

Able to regularly lift / carry 55 pound bags above waist level

Updated Covid-19 vaccination

Attendance expectations

40h / week spread over two sites as needed.

2-3 days a week at Garnerville

2-3 days a week at the Beacon location


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Ready for students: BHS showcases industrial arts center renovations https://maximumdouglas.com/ready-for-students-bhs-showcases-industrial-arts-center-renovations/ https://maximumdouglas.com/ready-for-students-bhs-showcases-industrial-arts-center-renovations/#respond Fri, 13 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/ready-for-students-bhs-showcases-industrial-arts-center-renovations/ By Leeanna Ellis – editor@enterprisepub.com The community got their first glimpse of the newly renovated industrial art center at Blair High School on Tuesday during an open house. The project, which cost just over $ 2 million, created a welding lab, with 14 stations, identical to the Metropolitan Community College lab on its South Omaha […]]]>

By Leeanna Ellis – editor@enterprisepub.com

The community got their first glimpse of the newly renovated industrial art center at Blair High School on Tuesday during an open house.

The project, which cost just over $ 2 million, created a welding lab, with 14 stations, identical to the Metropolitan Community College lab on its South Omaha campus. The 14,000-square-foot renovation also includes a construction science lab, a manufacturing lab, two art rooms, a drawing and computer lab, and a robotics and STEM lab.

“Our ultimate goal was to try and find the passion of every learner and align that passion to help them develop a skill set here at Blair that can serve as a stepping stone for them into the future,” said the Superintendent. Randy Gilson said at a ceremony ahead of the school tours, which were guided by students.

Gilson said the renovations were made possible through partnerships with the Metropolitan Community College and area businesses including Lozier, Sid Dillon and The John Day Company, which donated more than $ 450,000 in equipment to students. .

Metro lent BHS precision milling machines, lathes and equipped the welding stations. The college also provides instructors to teach welding and dual credit college courses in the manufacturing sector at no cost to the district.

Gilson said Metro president Randy Schmailzl was key to the partnership.

“This is a great day for Blair and the community… This opportunity to discover and be able to take college courses makes all the difference,” said Schmailzl.

Ralph Kleinsmith, head of talent research and development at Lozier, said jobs that were undesirable only 20 to 30 years ago are now desirable, which is important for industries like Lozier.

“The skilled trades are in high demand and are so desperately needed in our community and across our country,” he said.

Eileen Korth of Jackson, Jackson and Associates served as the architect on the project. She thanked the BCS administration and teachers Chris Schuler, Ed Mills and Kari Schueth for their collaboration on common goals for student improvement.

“They were really students. What can we do to make this space better serve our students, ”she said. “It is their passion, it is their expertise, it is their love for their students that you will see when you visit the institution.”

BCS COO, Tom Anderson, gave Gilson credit for establishing the partnerships necessary to make the project a success.

“It’s so exciting for our kids,” he said. “This is probably one of the first times that I see something come to fruition because Dr. Gilson dreamed of it and the school board approved it and got the support of the community. I just want to thank you all.

The new facility isn’t just for students who can take a two-year college program after high school, Anderson said. But rather for all students to test to see if they might like a career in welding, construction or manufacturing.

“Very few schools have this possibility. I would tell you that the metro schools probably say they offer these programs, but they have to go to those specific schools to get to this program, ”he said. “At Blair, we’re ready to offer here, they can test it. If we want to expand it, we can expand it and we will grow from it.

“The old saying ‘If you build it, they will come. So true, ”Anderson added.

There are 182 students who signed up for Welding, 108 for Automotive / Small Engines, 106 for Introduction to Technology / Programming and Website Design, 77 for Robotics, 27 for Manufacturing and 257 for construction.

There are 192 enrolled in art classes.

District 16 Senator Ben Hansen congratulated Gilson, the school board and the community on completing the facility.

“The skills training programs that will be taught here will benefit the Nebraska economy as the foundation is laid and next generation leaders learn to be electricians, welders, mechanics, carpenters, architects, construction workers and more.” again, ”he said.

After the open day, the neighborhood held a live auction to sell old equipment. The sale raised $ 9,203, which will be donated to the industrial arts program.


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At Crucible, Oakland Youth Can Explore Industrial Arts and Careers https://maximumdouglas.com/at-crucible-oakland-youth-can-explore-industrial-arts-and-careers/ https://maximumdouglas.com/at-crucible-oakland-youth-can-explore-industrial-arts-and-careers/#respond Tue, 10 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/at-crucible-oakland-youth-can-explore-industrial-arts-and-careers/ Free Oakland news, written by the Oaklanders, delivered straight to your inbox. Don’t let Facebook’s algorithm control your news. Sign up to receive Oakland News for free to your inbox. Thank you for supporting The Oaklandside and being a part of our community. Your donation makes this and all of our other local reporting possible. […]]]>

Free Oakland news, written by the Oaklanders, delivered straight to your inbox.


In 2015, I felt like doing something on a whim, so I signed up for a fire performance class at Crucible, a nonprofit industrial arts school in West Oakland. Every Monday for six weeks, I showed up, walked past machines that shaped metal, molded glass, and bonded leather, and learned to spin poi engulfed in flames around my head.

Dancing with fire is one of the many creative skills someone can learn at Le Creuset, along with blacksmithing, ceramics, glassware, woodworking, soldering, and even neon sign making. Founded in Berkeley in 1999 and moved to West Oakland in 2003, the Crucible is one of the nation’s largest nonprofit industrial arts schools, reaching over 8,000 people a year, according to its website.

Learning an industrial art or any craft can be hugely rewarding, but it’s also a privilege that often requires disposable income and extra time, and may seem out of reach for many low-income people. This is why the Crucible emphasizes the accessibility of its courses to low-income people and to BIPOC, especially young people.

The Crucible offers scholarships, subsidized courses, and leadership programs to engage community members who otherwise may not be able to enroll. It also partners with local schools to involve students in field trips. Natasha von Kaenel, director of marketing at Crucible, said the exhibit can be a powerful experience for children who have previously struggled to learn in traditional classrooms.

“The hands-on educational experiences they can access at Crucible School empower them and inspire them to think differently about their careers, interests and what excites them,” said von Kaenel.

A student working at the Crucible Youth Summer Camp in West Oakland.

The organization strives to provide more than $ 100,000 per year in scholarships, with priority given to BIPOC and low-income residents of Oakland. Le Creuset currently reserves 20% of all its youth classes for scholarship students.

Funders for the Crucible include the Port of Oakland, which recently awarded the association a $ 5,000 grant to expand youth access for the third year in a row. This money will be used specifically to pay the tuition fees of 10 young people from BIPOC to participate in the school’s industrial youth program, where they will learn new skills in blacksmithing, welding and other trades. The port is a major employer of industrial trades in the region, and von Kaenel said programming may expose local youth to career opportunities in industrial trades that could lead to well-paying jobs in the future.

One of Crucible’s flagship programs, the Fuego Youth Leadership Program, has been in existence since 2010. Each year, up to 10 students are selected, with the only requirement being that they have completed at least three courses at the school. Each participant is paired with an instructor for two consecutive summers, immersing themselves in creative work and exploring potential careers. During the graduation ceremony, which takes place at the end of July, the students unveil their final works. About 79% of leadership program participants identify as students of color and 80% are low income.

A young student welds at the Crucible Industrial Arts School in West Oakland.

Le Creuset also offers a pre-apprenticeship program that provides young people with training in metallurgy and the arts, a cycling program that teaches students the basics of bicycle mechanics, and a public art program where participants can create art installations. site specific.

“There are kids in the third or fourth grade, and they’ve never seen or been exposed to what these art forms are. Neither do many adults, ”said von Kaenel. “And you can’t know that something interests you if you don’t even know what it is.”

Although the majority of scholarships support young people, the school also offers an adult scholarship program. The Raphael Allen Scholarship Fund, named after an Oakland National Park Service ranger who was a regular at the Crucible and died in 2018, allows a number of people of color to attend classes for free.

But accessibility isn’t just about finances, said Rachel Anne Palacios, educator at Crucible: it’s about community engagement and delivering culturally relevant classes, as well as understanding the functional use of a class. , which can make the cost easier to justify.

Palacios was recruited last summer to teach a class in Mexican pewter art for children of all ages. During the 3-hour course, Palacios made sure to educate students on the meanings and symbolism of art before they started to create. “Teaching people this way binds people together, as opposed to just learning to do something, just to do it,” she said.

Being exposed to various art forms at The Crucible can help people decide if they like something enough to take it further by enrolling in accreditation courses offered elsewhere. “If you wanted to get a welding certification, for example, the crucible is a place where you can experiment to see if it’s something that interests you,” von Kaenel said, before “going to a place like Laney. College, where you could actually get accreditation.

The school also plans to expand adult programs with Centro Community Partners, which offers entrepreneurial training for people wishing to start a business where they can apply their skills.

Classes are available for children from the age of 8. For courses that require more supervision, such as fire courses, participants must be at least 12 years old. the fall.

Youth classes start at $ 135 for a 3-hour course, including woodturning, glassmaking, and neon tube bending (the Crucible is one of the few industrial arts venues to scale national school which teaches neon glass sculpture). Adult classes range from $ 200 to $ 700.

More information, on scholarships and free or subsidized courses, is available on the site.

Von Kaenel said the best way to support the Crucible in its goal of increasing scholarships is to register and attend a class.


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Mid-State Fair Industrial Arts Auction Brings $ 102,000 https://maximumdouglas.com/mid-state-fair-industrial-arts-auction-brings-102000/ https://maximumdouglas.com/mid-state-fair-industrial-arts-auction-brings-102000/#respond Wed, 28 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/mid-state-fair-industrial-arts-auction-brings-102000/ $ 35,000 raised for the James W. Brabeck Foundation –The 2021 Industrial Art Auction was held on Thursday, July 22, on Ranchers and Farmers Day at the California Mid-State Fair. This year’s auction, with auctioneer Rick Machado, brought in $ 102,000, thanks to the generous support of the community. Over $ 750,000 has been raised […]]]>

$ 35,000 raised for the James W. Brabeck Foundation

–The 2021 Industrial Art Auction was held on Thursday, July 22, on Ranchers and Farmers Day at the California Mid-State Fair. This year’s auction, with auctioneer Rick Machado, brought in $ 102,000, thanks to the generous support of the community. Over $ 750,000 has been raised since the auction began over 20 years ago.

An additional $ 35,000 was raised to support the James W. Brabeck Foundation (JWBYLF), which serves agricultural-related and at-risk youth in the community through scholarships and fundraising campaigns that will help influence their future. Since its inception in 2017, JWBYLF has been instrumental in supporting exhibitors at the California Mid-State Fair. In 2020, JWBYLF raised over $ 200,000 which was used to purchase livestock, with nearly 50,000 pounds of protein donated to the SLO County Food Bank.

Airgas has been the main sponsor of the industrial education program since its inception; the program was designed to showcase the many talents of local high school manufacturers. High school store instructors supervise their students, who design a variety of projects using basic and advanced welding techniques, to produce barbecues, trailers, utility racks, wine racks, store benches, porch swings, coffee tables and other projects.

The 2021 California Mid-State Fair runs from July 21 to August 1 and is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year.

About the Author: Staff News

Paso Robles Daily News press staff wrote or edited this story based on local contributors and press releases. News staff can be reached at info@pasoroblesdailynews.com.


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Mid-State Fair industrial arts auction items get big bids https://maximumdouglas.com/mid-state-fair-industrial-arts-auction-items-get-big-bids/ https://maximumdouglas.com/mid-state-fair-industrial-arts-auction-items-get-big-bids/#respond Fri, 23 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/mid-state-fair-industrial-arts-auction-items-get-big-bids/ Kerrigan Jensen and Samantha Buie. Each year, students in wood and metal workshops sell their projects at the industrial arts auction. – The industrial arts auction at the California Mid-State Fair this week was low in inventory, but sale prices went through the roof of the barn. Kerrigan Jensen of Atascadero High School built a […]]]>

Kerrigan Jensen and Samantha Buie.

Each year, students in wood and metal workshops sell their projects at the industrial arts auction.

– The industrial arts auction at the California Mid-State Fair this week was low in inventory, but sale prices went through the roof of the barn.

Kerrigan Jensen of Atascadero High School built a coffee table with a metal American flag on a wooden base. His coffee table sold for $ 10,000 to a family in Creston. A picnic table brought in $ 7,000. A dog house cost $ 4,500.

Samantha Buie, a high school student from Paso Robles, and other welding students produced 15 barbecues. The barbecues are the brainchild of PRHS welding instructor Justin Pickcard. The sale of the barbecues generated over $ 30,000 for the Jim Brabeck Foundation to help FFA students who raised cattle for the fair.

Blake wallis

The industrial arts auction is organized annually by Blake Wallis.

Each year, dozens of students from wood and metal workshops sell their projects at the industrial arts auction, but few students have had access to school stores due to the pandemic. Some worked independently from home. At Paso Robles High School, students could work about two hours a week soldering barbecues.

The industrial arts auction is hosted annually by Blake Wallis, but he is retiring after this year’s auction.

About the Author: Staff News

Paso Robles Daily News press staff wrote or edited this story based on local contributors and press releases. News staff can be reached at info@pasoroblesdailynews.com.


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