Industrial design – Maximum Douglas http://maximumdouglas.com/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 08:09:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://maximumdouglas.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Industrial design – Maximum Douglas http://maximumdouglas.com/ 32 32 Student exhibit offers insight into industrial design process https://maximumdouglas.com/student-exhibit-offers-insight-into-industrial-design-process/ https://maximumdouglas.com/student-exhibit-offers-insight-into-industrial-design-process/#respond Wed, 27 Oct 2021 23:15:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/student-exhibit-offers-insight-into-industrial-design-process/ ArtWorks Gallery presents ID @ ArtWorks, its first exhibition focused on industrial design work, allowing students to showcase their entire creative process, from sketches and prints to models and large installation pieces. ID @ ArtWorks highlights the fine art side of a more commercial realm in which students learn to blend practical functionality and design […]]]>

ArtWorks Gallery presents ID @ ArtWorks, its first exhibition focused on industrial design work, allowing students to showcase their entire creative process, from sketches and prints to models and large installation pieces.

ID @ ArtWorks highlights the fine art side of a more commercial realm in which students learn to blend practical functionality and design with a finely tuned presentation of a gallery frame.

The opening on November 3, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., will take place at the same time and at the same place as the artists’ reception in New image gallery, with Remains; the spaces between artists Cass Rinsler and Talia Tamar were present. Remains is the second part of a Rinsler exhibition that started in September; with installation and performance. Both receptions will be open to the public and will offer food and drink.

ID @ ArtWorks will be open at the Industrial Design Society of America conference, Beyond the box, organized by the JMU School of Art, Design and Art History, November 12-13.

A virtual tour of the exhibition will be posted on the ArtWorks website at https://artworksgallery.wixsite.com/artworksgallery.

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ArtWorks Gallery is JMU’s student-run gallery where students develop and present their artistic voice. The gallery serves as an inspiration to all JMU students while providing a space to present student art in a professional setting to the community of Harrisonburg. The gallery strives to help students create new relationships and encourage unique and original ideas.

Contact: Dr. Beth Hinderliter, ArtWorks Gallery Educational Advisor, (540) 568-6407, hindersb@jmu.edu; Corinne Diop, director of the new image gallery, (540) 568-6485, diopcj@jmu.edu.


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Latest renders of Huawei Mate 50 Pro show changes in industrial design – https://maximumdouglas.com/latest-renders-of-huawei-mate-50-pro-show-changes-in-industrial-design/ https://maximumdouglas.com/latest-renders-of-huawei-mate-50-pro-show-changes-in-industrial-design/#respond Tue, 26 Oct 2021 10:12:20 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/latest-renders-of-huawei-mate-50-pro-show-changes-in-industrial-design/ The Huawei P50 series arrived around six months late. This means that the next Huawei Mate 50 series will also experience delays. We all know the reason (s) for these delays. Huawei is struggling with its supply chain due to the US ban As for the Mate 50 series, this year is definitely out of […]]]>

The Huawei P50 series arrived around six months late. This means that the next Huawei Mate 50 series will also experience delays. We all know the reason (s) for these delays. Huawei is struggling with its supply chain due to the US ban As for the Mate 50 series, this year is definitely out of the question. However, the expectations are that this series will launch in the first quarter of next year. A recent report claims that the Huawei mate 50 series has made a major breakthrough in its supply chain. The Weibo post also claims that this flagship series will arrive on schedule. A few days ago, art master HoiIndi drew the latest rendering of the Huawei Mate 50 Pro.

These renderings show that the front of this device is similar to the Huawei P50 Pro. It comes with a curved design as well as a center hole punch camera. As expected, the rear is more unique and exquisite than the front. The Huawei Mate 50 Pro continues the outline design of the circular camera module. In the module, it has a circular dual camera housing similar to the P50 Pro. The camera housing at the top contains three sensors while the lower one contains a camera sensor, an LED flash and a presumably zoom square camera.

Huawei Mate 50 Pro

Judging by the shape of the camera circle, this should only be an imaginary image. After all, the size of the lens aperture is basically the same, which is not true in practice. We have reason to believe that the Huawei Mate 50 Pro will retain the freeform super wide-angle lens, RYYB CMOS, and more, but it’s unclear if Leica will participate.

Huawei Mate 50 series speculation

According to speculation so far, the Huawei Mate 50 series will use the same LTPO display as the iPhone 13 Pro series. In addition, this display will support adaptive refresh rate which not only achieves high refresh rate of 120Hz, but also saves power.

In addition to the Qualcomm Snapdragon 898 4G SoC, this device may also have the Kirin 9000 version. The Snapdragon 898 is a flagship processor that uses Samsung’s 4nm manufacturing process. This chip uses a 1 + 3 + 4 architecture. It has one large Cortex X2 core at 3.0 GHz, three large Cortex A78 cores at 2.5 GHz and four small Cortex A55 cores at 1.79 GHz. On AnTuTu, this chip will most likely exceed one million for the first time. As of yet, there is no specific launch date for the upcoming Huawei Mate 50 series.


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Industrial design students invent an innovative kit for military use https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-design-students-invent-an-innovative-kit-for-military-use/ https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-design-students-invent-an-innovative-kit-for-military-use/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 16:08:35 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-design-students-invent-an-innovative-kit-for-military-use/ Reading time: 3 minutes “The Tube”, inspired by badminton tubes, features a pyramid design of detachable waterproof tubes connected with Velcro, each large enough to store equipment. (Image courtesy of Tomas Spasiuk) As an undergraduate student, Kai Keewatin was torn between two passions: graphic design and his long-held dream of enlisting in the Canadian Armed […]]]>
Reading time: 3 minutes

“The Tube”, inspired by badminton tubes, features a pyramid design of detachable waterproof tubes connected with Velcro, each large enough to store equipment. (Image courtesy of Tomas Spasiuk)

As an undergraduate student, Kai Keewatin was torn between two passions: graphic design and his long-held dream of enlisting in the Canadian Armed Forces.

During the second year of his design program at the University of Alberta, he finally enlisted with Lord Strathcona’s Horse in Edmonton, where he obtained his military uniform in 2016.

He is now captain of the regiment, but the principles of design are never far from his mind. Realizing this interest, Keewatin’s commander asked him to design a better commander kit for a tank – essentially a bag that contains notebooks, binoculars, GPS, maps, and whatever else is needed in the field.

“A commander’s kit is something that doesn’t really exist,” Keewatin said, adding that commanders tend to just throw gear in a helmet bag.

“I was just thinking, there has to be a way to apply a finer level of design to that to create something more functional. “

The main challenge is that there is simply no room inside a tank for such a kit. It must fit perfectly between the two hatches of the outer turret. It should also be durable enough to withstand temperatures of -40 C to 40 C, waterproofed and raised so that if it gets wet it will not freeze in the turret in cold weather.

Seeking help, Keewatin returned the challenge to his alma mater, confident that students in the art and design department could come up with innovative ideas.

And they did.

This is certainly not the first time that fourth-year industrial design students have taken on real-world assignments, said Greig Rasmussen, Design 502 instructor.

Two years ago, they designed temporary storage facilities for homeless people in Edmonton. More recently, they submitted ideas for the upcoming renovation of the ground floor of the Student Union building, based on surveys of student preferences.

But this is the first time they have been approached by the army.

“I was blown away by their work,” Keewatin said. “Even with the pandemic, they managed to create some really cool designs. Everyone we showed it to in the regiment loved what they came up with.

Once divided into groups, the students interviewed the crew commanders with detailed questions about what they would like to see in a kit.

“Part of the design brief was that it had to be personalized for each commander since everyone has certain things they want together,” Rasmussen said.

“It’s so important for students to have real clients. We want to move beyond the idea of ​​just designing cool stuff – it has to meet the customer’s needs.

One of the less conventional designs was a pyramid of tubes connected by Velcro, each large enough to store equipment.

“You can either detach one and bring it to the tank, or tie it up and take it to a field meeting,” Rasmussen said.

The pandemic imposed certain limits on the experimentation because the students did not have access to the hardware workshops and had to settle for computer renderings.

At the same time, working from home meant that everyday items at hand were a source of inspiration.

“We had badminton tubes in our rooms,” said student Tomas Spasiuk, whose group worked on the design of the tubular pyramid. “If you try to demonstrate how things would work – with, say, one smaller tube sliding inside the other – that helps the team get rid of it. “

Other designs included traditional bag shapes, double suitcase styles and even “luxury executive suitcases with different compartments,” Rasmussen said.

The students were also given a mission from Keewatin to design “Challenge Coins,” used to recognize outstanding achievement and participation in significant events such as campaigns, periods of service, military exercises and relief efforts in disaster.

The designs have now been submitted to Keewatin’s unit, where they’ll likely “pick” ideas to produce their own version, Rasmussen said.

“They have very good internal saddlery stores at the military base.”

Given the success of the collaboration, Rasmussen said he hopes for further postings from the military this fall.

“They are fantastic clients,” said Spasiuk, “because they knew the process and they knew how to give great feedback which is so invaluable.

“It kind of made me fall in love with product design. You take that idea that gets someone excited, and then you give them something that they can actually use.

| By Geoff McMaster


This article was submitted by the University of Alberta Folio online journal. The University of Alberta is an editorial content partner of Troy Media.

© Troy Media
Troy Media is an editorial content provider for the media and its own community media hosted across Canada.


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industrial design professor writes a book on shipbuilding techniques | News, Sports, Jobs https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-design-professor-writes-a-book-on-shipbuilding-techniques-news-sports-jobs/ https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-design-professor-writes-a-book-on-shipbuilding-techniques-news-sports-jobs/#respond Thu, 30 Sep 2021 05:55:27 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-design-professor-writes-a-book-on-shipbuilding-techniques-news-sports-jobs/ Thomas E. Ask teaches his students at Pennsylvania College of Technology that industrial design connects art with engineering and that they must use multiple tools, materials and processes to develop creative solutions and products, often for people. different from them. For proof, the professor of industrial design can refer to his recently published book – […]]]>

Thomas E. Ask teaches his students at Pennsylvania College of Technology that industrial design connects art with engineering and that they must use multiple tools, materials and processes to develop creative solutions and products, often for people. different from them.

For proof, the professor of industrial design can refer to his recently published book – “Wooden Wonders: Traditional Malaysian Fishing Boats” – a 162-page book examining ancient boat building techniques that remain a staple in the Southeast Asian country.

“My book is all about designing for the other. That is, designing things for people who are different from us. This requires techniques rooted in both engineering and anthropology to achieve successful and appropriate designs ”, Ask explained.

Derived from his doctoral thesis, the book examines the technical and social factors that influenced the design and construction of wooden boats, a vital form of transportation that dates back centuries in Malaysia. The country, made up of two non-contiguous regions bordering the South China Sea, is referenced in ancient texts for its central role in maritime trade.

“Wooden wonders” mixes ethnographic study and technical evaluations and presents unique boat designs. Ask also hopes that it will serve as an archive for the state of wooden boat building. A chapter offers on-site measurement of the hull of an 18-meter fishing boat and a detailed photograph.

Aimed at specialists in ethnographic design and maritime history, the book is published by the academic press of Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, considered the best engineering school in the country. Ask spent a semester there in 2009 as a visiting professor of mechanical engineering.

In October, the school plans to host a webinar featuring Ask to coincide with the release of their book.

“Wooden wonders” is the eighth book of Ask. He currently writes science fiction short stories for young adults on Kindle Vella, Amazon’s serial reading platform.

A licensed professional engineer, Ask taught at Penn College for 20 years. He advises the Society of Inventors and Mad Scientists on campus.

Ask holds a PhD in Industrial Design from Middlesex University, a Certificate in Management from Cornell University, an MA in Liberal Studies from Excelsior College and a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the ‘University of Illinois. He is a member of the Industrial Designers Society of America and the American Society for Engineering Education.

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20 women-led industrial design and innovation companies you should know https://maximumdouglas.com/20-women-led-industrial-design-and-innovation-companies-you-should-know/ https://maximumdouglas.com/20-women-led-industrial-design-and-innovation-companies-you-should-know/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 15:31:40 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/20-women-led-industrial-design-and-innovation-companies-you-should-know/ As we started to work on this project to spotlight female-led design studios, we quickly realized that there were too many notable studios to fit into one post and decided the project deserved a series. in several parts. (You can read Part 1 here.) We repeatedly hear the question “where are the women in industrial […]]]>

As we started to work on this project to spotlight female-led design studios, we quickly realized that there were too many notable studios to fit into one post and decided the project deserved a series. in several parts. (You can read Part 1 here.) We repeatedly hear the question “where are the women in industrial design?” Well, it looks like a lot of people are starting their own studios! Here you’ll find a list of 20 female-owned or run design studios that you should support or hire to add a diverse perspective to your projects.

Anvil Studios

IG: @anvil_studios

Treasure Hinds is co-founder and partner of Anvil Studios, a boutique industrial design studio located in Seattle, WA. Anvil Studios designs physical products for a wide range of industries, following a traditional industrial design process while tailoring each project specifically to the client’s needs.

Baby carriers “Shell” for Bell Sports by Anvil Studios

Blumline

IG: @theblumline

Blumline is a knowledge-based innovation studio led by Natasha Margot Blum, Senior Director and CEO. Based in Oakland, California, Blumline offers a wide range of services including research and strategy, industrial design, service design, experiment design, and more.

Blumline led the research and design strategy for Nesos, a wearable earphone for treating rheumatoid arthritis

Egg design

IG: @eggsdesign

Ulla Sommerfelt is CEO of Egg design, a Norway-based innovation consultancy with additional offices in Denmark. EGGS works holistically to combine human knowledge with technology, brand and business and offers a range of services including UX design, service design and industrial design.

Xplory X for Stokke

Launch studio

IG: @leadoffstudio

Jessica Diatlo is Co-Founder and Head of Product Development at Launch studio At New York. Leadoff studio takes a user-centric approach to designing innovative product experiences for customers.

Reusable Eco-Friendly Protective PPE Case for CastleGrade

Troy Studio

IG: @juliatroydirects, @ troy.studio

Julia Troy is creative director of Troy Studio in Stamford, Connecticut, which provides product photography, video production and creative direction services for brands. Julia also works as an independent consultant in the areas of ideation, industrial design, design direction and sprints.

Styling and photography by Troy Studio for Flow

Kinder MODERN / studiokinder

IG: @kindermodern, @femaledesigncouncil

Lora Appleton is the founder of MORE MODERN and studiokinder, a design studio that creates collections of furniture, objects and rugs for children of all ages. Studiokinder translates the needs of growing children into useful luxury furniture and works alongside architects, interior designers and developers. Lora Appleton is also the founder of the Feminine design advice.

Residential project w kinder GROUND Rug, Photographer: Dane Tashima

Ayana Patterson

Ayana Patterson is a luxury CMF and shape designer focused primarily on the housewares and hospitality industries. Its services include design leadership, market research, CMF and shape strategy, and branding.

Mixology Box RL 50 by Ayana Patterson for Ralph Lauren

OI Studio

IG: @ostudio_

BOA is the founder and creative director of OI Studio, a New Orleans, LA-based design firm that creates custom furniture and home accessories using sustainable materials and processes. OI Studio’s design aesthetic is an intersection of respect for nature, minimalism and craftsmanship.

TCHAD storage bed by OI Studio

Diagram

IG: @diagramoffice, @yahnopodcast

Diagram was founded by Miya Osaki and Tina Park and is based in New York City. Diagram is dedicated to improving healthcare experiences by seeing through the patient’s eyes, leveraging tools for human-centered design, service design, user experience / interface design , etc.

Patient self-management app for Cahoots by diagram

Interlaced

IG: @interwoven_design

Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman is the founder of Interlaced design in Brooklyn, New York. Interwoven specializes in smart textile solutions and wearable technology, connecting the disciplines of fashion, engineering, material science and product design.

Fiber optic tutu for the Brooklyn Ballet

Catalan design

IG: @catalanodesign

Carol Catalano is the founder of Catalan design in Boston, MA. Catalano Design creates physical products for companies in a wide range of industries and believes that good design is a balance between art, science and craftsmanship, supported by user-centered research.

HE560 for HIFIMAN

Large Good Studio

IG: @greatergoodstudio

Sara Cantor is the co-founder of Large Good Studio, whose mission is to advance people-centered social change. Greater Good Studio is based in Chicago, Illinois, and combines the structure of human-centered design with the relational nature of community engagement.

Create equitable access to the Girl Scout experience with Girl Scouts in Greater Chicago and Northwest Indiana

Jennifer linnan

Jennifer linnan is a Boston, MA-based designer providing industrial design, user-centered design, user research and testing, as well as UX and visual design services. His work spans a range of industries, including medical and life sciences, consumer products, and industrial products.

Vectra Polaris Automated Pathology Imaging System for Perkin Elmer

Mottoform

IG: @mottoform

Elizabeth Salonen is the founder of Mottoform, a Canadian-based industrial design and consulting studio. Mottoform offers a wide range and works in the areas of product design, textiles / surfaces, housewares and furniture.

Suunto Lumi, the first outdoor instrument specially designed for women for Suunto

Ground

Gill Wildman is co-founder and director of Ground, a strategic design agency that leverages user-centered research and design thinking to reinvent digital systems, products and services. Plot is based in London, UK.

Workshop for Human Regeneration in Hackney Wick, by Plot

Product design Anke Salomon

IG: @salomonproductdesign

Anke Solomon is the founder of Anke Salomon Product Design in Berlin, Germany. Anke Salomon Product design works closely with clients for the process of product design, engineering and realization.

Knife holder in drawer by Anke Salomon for Wüsthof

STBY

Geke van Dijk is co-founder and strategic director of STBY, a design research agency based in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. STBY is an interdisciplinary team of creators and researchers in the social sciences and seeks to apply research for meaningful and positive transformation.

Design research projects for public space by STBY for the city of Amsterdam

ROAD

IG: @prowl__

ROAD is a design and future materials consultancy founded by Lauryn Menard and based in Oakland, California. PROWL’s collective mission is to make the material world more sustainable. With a unique combination of material innovation and strategic foresight, PROWL helps its clients to sustain their businesses.

Photo by Smile Plastics

Observatory

IG: @observatorydesign

Ayako Takase is co-founder and director of Observatory, a multidisciplinary design studio in Providence, RI. Observatory has experience in a wide range of disciplines, from furniture and personal care products to structural packaging and interface design.

Aria desk for Herman Miller

ProductLogic LLC

IG: @ productlogic.llc

Merry Constantino is founder and director of Product logic, a product design consulting firm in Buffalo, NY. ProductLogic acts as an innovation partner for companies in a variety of industries, offering a full range of services from market research to specifications and production.

Disinfection Station for Allé Designs by ProductLogicLLC


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Biomedical Engineering and Industrial Design Students Collaborate in Design Sprint for Healthcare Solutions | VTx https://maximumdouglas.com/biomedical-engineering-and-industrial-design-students-collaborate-in-design-sprint-for-healthcare-solutions-vtx/ https://maximumdouglas.com/biomedical-engineering-and-industrial-design-students-collaborate-in-design-sprint-for-healthcare-solutions-vtx/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/biomedical-engineering-and-industrial-design-students-collaborate-in-design-sprint-for-healthcare-solutions-vtx/ Through feedback from patient advocates and healthcare professionals, students learned research skills, incorporated feedback into proposed solutions, and worked with technical systems to prepare prototypes of potential solutions in the field. During the summer design sprint, students then had the opportunity to brainstorm innovative designs to help solve problems encountered in pediatric nephrology. After the […]]]>

Through feedback from patient advocates and healthcare professionals, students learned research skills, incorporated feedback into proposed solutions, and worked with technical systems to prepare prototypes of potential solutions in the field.

During the summer design sprint, students then had the opportunity to brainstorm innovative designs to help solve problems encountered in pediatric nephrology. After the initial brainstorming, the students prototyped and tested their designs.

“The passion and creativity of the students was truly inspiring,” said Arena, director of experiential learning in biomedical engineering and mechanics. “In just five days, they were able to integrate information from different stakeholders and come up with unique solutions to make the home dialysis process less intimidating for patients and caregivers. In addition, they built functional prototypes that took advantage of the complementary skills of biomedical engineers and industrial designers. “

Each student brought their own academic perspective to the group, teaching their teammates while gaining new knowledge from others, Morshedzadeh said. This combination of interdisciplinary collaboration and access to resources has given rise to new ideas and innovative solutions.

For the testing phase, the students brought their designs to Carilion Clinic Simulation, Research and Patient Safety Center. Sarah Henrickson Parker, associate research professor at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC, directs human factors research at the simulation center and oversaw the testing of student prototypes. Parker, who is also an associate research professor at College of Sciencesthe Department of Psychology and the Departments of Surgery and Basic Science Education Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, also supervised students during the final phase of the tests.

Students also had access to other mentors in related fields, including John Robertson, research professor in biomedical and mechanical engineering and doctor of veterinary medicine, and Andre Muelenaer, practice professor in biomedical and mechanical engineering and Virginia Tech Carilion. School of Medicine, in addition to being a leader TEAM Malawi, a transdisciplinary collaboration based on a community well-being health model. The students were also mentored by healthcare professionals who work in home hemodialysis at Valley Nephrology Associates. The diverse backgrounds of the mentors provided perspectives for the students to apply.


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Student work in industrial design: the forest druids of Segev Kaspi https://maximumdouglas.com/student-work-in-industrial-design-the-forest-druids-of-segev-kaspi/ https://maximumdouglas.com/student-work-in-industrial-design-the-forest-druids-of-segev-kaspi/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/student-work-in-industrial-design-the-forest-druids-of-segev-kaspi/ Here’s a wonderfully bizarre and terribly imaginative project from industrial design student Segev Kaspi. Called Forest druids, this is Kaspi’s graduation project at Israel’s Shenkar College of Engineering, Design and Art, and it aimed to “stimulate public debate on atmospheric CO2 levels and the importance of rehabilitating the forests of the world “. Kaspi imagined […]]]>

Here’s a wonderfully bizarre and terribly imaginative project from industrial design student Segev Kaspi. Called Forest druids, this is Kaspi’s graduation project at Israel’s Shenkar College of Engineering, Design and Art, and it aimed to “stimulate public debate on atmospheric CO2 levels and the importance of rehabilitating the forests of the world “. Kaspi imagined surprising shapes at the intersection of robotics and character design:

“A series of robotic rangers have been developed to support reforestation efforts and sustainable forest management.”

“Each robot is assigned a defined role in the management and preservation of the forest. Their roles and design language reflect a long process of studying the work of rangers and an attempt to gain a thorough understanding of the needs of the forest rangers. forests of the world. “

“Robotic foresters operate in systems that change according to the needs of the forest and can function as separate individuals or as members of working groups.

“The visual and conceptual power of the project derives from the hybrid connection of two worlds perceived as opposites – nature and technology – to offer a possible solution to a pressing problem.”

Here are animations of the tasks they would perform:

Enter a caption (optional)

Discover more of Kaspi’s work here.


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The colorful language of industrial design by Julie Richoz https://maximumdouglas.com/the-colorful-language-of-industrial-design-by-julie-richoz/ https://maximumdouglas.com/the-colorful-language-of-industrial-design-by-julie-richoz/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/the-colorful-language-of-industrial-design-by-julie-richoz/ The colorful language of industrial design by Julie Richoz Franco-Swiss designer Julie Richoz studied at ECAL (where she now also teaches) and created her design studio in Paris in 2015, after assisting designer Pierre Charpin. Whether it is furniture or design objects, his pieces are characterized by their brilliance and lightness. “I’ve been following his […]]]>

The colorful language of industrial design by Julie Richoz

Franco-Swiss designer Julie Richoz studied at ECAL (where she now also teaches) and created her design studio in Paris in 2015, after assisting designer Pierre Charpin. Whether it is furniture or design objects, his pieces are characterized by their brilliance and lightness. “I’ve been following his work since his student days,” says Nendo’s Oki Sato, who named Richoz as one of 25 creative leaders of the future in Wallpaper’s 25th anniversary “5×5” project. “I can see the Bouroullec brothers’ DNA in it, but its unique sense for color and exceptional detail makes it completely original.”

Not content with collecting clients such as Louis Poulsen, Hay, Tectona, Galerie Kreo and Mattiazzi, Richoz won the Swiss Design Award 2019 for his commitment “to explore ancient crafts, including non-European ones, and to integrate them into the design of contemporary objects ”. His objects, we read in the award press release, “are created in close connection with specific production sites to affirm the value of local and traditional craftsmanship”.

Carpet, for Hay

Its distinctive design language has been defined through design residencies including the CIRVA / Center for Research on Art and Glass in Marseille (2013), the Cité de la Céramique in Sèvres (2013) and the Casa Wabi, the Bosco Sodi’s residency program at the Tadao Ando-designed art foundation in Mexico (2017). For the latter, Richoz collaborated with a palm weaver from Mechoacán, creating a series of minimalist room dividers that explored varying degrees of transparency, using weaving patterns from the traditional to the most innovative.

Recent projects include Shed, which is part of the “Knit! »Exhibition – Kvadrat’s initiative involving 28 emerging global designers who were invited to create furniture and objects using the Kvadrat Febrik range of textiles. Following research into the history of textile architecture and nomadic structures, she created a work of mini-architecture with the ‘Plecto’ fabric collection, exploring how textiles can create space and the structure. “I love that a space can be formed only with textile surfaces,” she said. “Sometimes a simple surface like a roof or a floor has the capacity to create the abstraction of a house, a welcoming situation.

Bowls ‘Portobello’, for Mattiazzi. Photography: Gerhardt Kellerman

Throughout his work, his strong interest in artisanal techniques emerges with projects such as the ‘Giro’ tableware for Trame, in terracotta hand-turned and following a mathematical grid, or the ‘Noise’ and ‘Stereo rugs. ‘, both handcrafted in Morocco. by local artisans.

Commissioned by Italian brand Mattiazzi to create a series of accessories, she recently unveiled the ‘Portobello’ bowls, a duo of organically shaped objects made from solid ash, available in a natural, oiled or stained finish in a distinctive blue hue. . Unveiling the pieces, she said: “What interests me is the craftsmanship, the precision in the way the materials are used, and that things are done with passion. §

‘Vases Oreilles’, created during the CIRVA residency in Marseille

‘Isla’ vases, 2019. Photography: courtesy of Side Gallery


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Industrial design hacking cat | Hackaday https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-design-hacking-cat-hackaday/ https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-design-hacking-cat-hackaday/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/industrial-design-hacking-cat-hackaday/ Join us on Wednesday September 8 at noon Pacific for the Industrial design hacking cat with Eric Strebel! At Hackaday, we celebrate all kinds of hardware hacks, and we try not to judge by looks. After all, every product starts on the breadboard, or as a prototype built with hot glue and duct tape. What […]]]>

Join us on Wednesday September 8 at noon Pacific for the Industrial design hacking cat with Eric Strebel!

At Hackaday, we celebrate all kinds of hardware hacks, and we try not to judge by looks. After all, every product starts on the breadboard, or as a prototype built with hot glue and duct tape. What is important is to make it work, at least in the beginning. But there comes a time when you need to think about how to make your project look like something people want to use, how to position controls and displays in a logical and appealing way, and how to make sure your stuff can. actually be built. .

Turning a project into a product is the job of an industrial designer. Almost everything you use, from the toothbrush by your sink to the car you drive in at work, bears the hallmarks of industrial design, some with more success than others. Eric Strebel has been doing industrial design for years, and he continues to give us a steady diet of design tips and tricks throughout. his popular YouTube channel. He will stop at Hack Chat to learn a little more about the principles of industrial design and how you can make your projects look as good as they work.

Our Hack Chats are live community events in the Hackaday.io Hack Chat Group Messaging. This week we will be sitting on Wednesday, September 8 at 12:00 p.m. PT. If time zones have blocked you, we have a convenient time zone converter.


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Thesis project in fantastic industrial design: Le Cercle Bicycle Camper https://maximumdouglas.com/thesis-project-in-fantastic-industrial-design-le-cercle-bicycle-camper/ https://maximumdouglas.com/thesis-project-in-fantastic-industrial-design-le-cercle-bicycle-camper/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://maximumdouglas.com/thesis-project-in-fantastic-industrial-design-le-cercle-bicycle-camper/ For his bachelor’s thesis at the Austrian University of Applied Sciences FH Joanneum, Industrial design student Bernhard Sobotta started with the question: “Can you integrate an overnight stay on the bike?” His resulting creation is the Circle bike: Bernhard Sobotta © FH JOANNEUM / Industrial Design Bernhard Sobotta © FH JOANNEUM / Industrial Design Bernhard […]]]>

For his bachelor’s thesis at the Austrian University of Applied Sciences FH Joanneum, Industrial design student Bernhard Sobotta started with the question: “Can you integrate an overnight stay on the bike?”

His resulting creation is the Circle bike:

Bernhard Sobotta © FH JOANNEUM / Industrial Design

Bernhard Sobotta © FH JOANNEUM / Industrial Design

Bernhard Sobotta © FH JOANNEUM / Industrial Design

Bernhard Sobotta © FH JOANNEUM / Industrial Design

Bernhard Sobotta © FH JOANNEUM / Industrial Design

Bernhard Sobotta © FH JOANNEUM / Industrial Design

Bernhard Sobotta © FH JOANNEUM / Industrial Design

Bernhard Sobotta © FH JOANNEUM / Industrial Design

Bernhard Sobotta © FH JOANNEUM / Industrial Design

Bernhard Sobotta © FH JOANNEUM / Industrial Design

“Cercle offers a professional answer to all areas of everyday nomadic life through modified frame geometry and integrated construction of bed, chair, table. By simply unfolding the bed frame, any suitable place can become a campsite, no matter what. The height adjustable table and the construction of the bed converted into a chair provide a portable workplace. The luggage, driver and vehicle roof provides security and allows the adventurer to blend in with his vehicle.

If that sounds a bit far-fetched i never would student concept for you, consider that Sobotta puts his money where his mouth is. The avid cyclist, along with his friend William Cornwell, took the Circle on a long-distance test drive, covering nearly 1,000 kilometers. For the sections of the trip where they had to take the bike on a train or a bus, “We always found a free space somewhere, despite the slight excess in length.”

In an interview with Citizens by bicycle, Sobotta discusses the creation and continued development of the project. “Until now, touring bikes have been based on a very narrowly defined initial question: What does a lightweight, durable machine have to look like to be able to go around the world on its own? That was a good and important question. – and he received a complete and satisfactory answer.

“When traveling, we don’t just want to move forward, we also want to eat, relax, sleep. Questions you ask yourself over and over: Where can I sit, relax and have a snack? Where to put the stove so that it does not fall? Where can I find a place for the tent that is reasonably flat, clean, and maybe even dry? Do I leave my panniers outside today or do I prefer to bring them to my tent to keep them safe? These questions have not yet been adequately answered when it comes to touring cycling, which is why there is still a lot of room for development and innovation. “

During the long test trip, Sobotta found that “the user experience in camping mode is really nice. The multifunctional frame of the bed-chair-bouncer-table, which we call CampingCompanion, can be quickly unfolded. You sit well, the table is fairly stable, you can sleep relaxed, and overall this module weighs only 3.5 kilograms. “

Sobotta and Cornwell plan to embark on a round-the-world cycle tour next year, each of them riding a Circle. This fall, ahead of the trip, the pair are trying to work out one of the remaining design issues, and they might need a little help. “A big chapter is definitely the design and customization of the tent,” says Sobotta. “So far we have used an old tarp as an emergency solution. It would be ideal to find someone who is interested in the project and has experience building tents.

You can follow the evolution of the Circle (and / or contact them if you have an idea of ​​a solution) on Instagram and Facebook.

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